Professional Development Opportunities

Virtual Summer Teacher Institute

Online

 

July 27th – July 30th, 2019

Virtual Online Professional Development

There is no cost to attend and Continuing Education Units (CEUs) will be provided for each training.

    July 27, 2020      1:00pm – 2:30pm MST

    Building Resilience: “Upstream” Approaches for Suicide Prevention

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of 10 and 24 (cdc.gov) and rates have been increasing in every state over the past decade.  Suicide is complicated and is rarely caused by one factor or event. It is a serious public health problem which affects families, schools and communities and has a long-lasting impact on the people left behind. But suicides are preventable. Suicide prevention efforts have largely focused on strategies to identify and get help for those who are at risk for suicide or who have shown warning signs of concerning behavior. There is a growing focus on prevention efforts that are more proactive. This “upstream” prevention approach involves working to reduce risk factors and enhance protective factors prior to the onset of suicidal thoughts and behaviors. This workshop will move beyond the basics of traditional suicide prevention workshops in order to provide practical strategies and tools that inoculate students well before suicidal thoughts or behaviors ever emerge.

    Presenters: 

    Dr. Perri Rosen, Consulting Psychologist, Pennsylvania Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Department of Human Services

    Stephen Sharp, School Counselor, Hempfield School District

    July 28, 2020    8:00am – 9:30am MST

    The Power of Self-Regulation

    As much as we try to protect them, children experience stressors in their daily lives—and right now there are many! In this workshop, we will learn about the importance of self-regulation, which is the way people respond to, and recover from stress. Aimed at helping teachers consult with parents, and arming teachers with tools for classroom re-entry, we will explore what affects a child's ability to self-regulate, gain new insights into how to calm a stressed child, and learn tools to help children eventually regulate themselves.  

    Presenter:

    Erica Brentan, School Climate and Social-Emotional Learning Specialist

    ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­July 28th          10am to 12:30pm MST

    The Impact of Trauma on the Development of the Mind and Brain

    The relationships children experience with their primary caregivers become the template from which they understand all other relationships and the lens through which they view interactions outside the family. When disruptions to those relationships occur, and particularly when they are ongoing, children tend to adapt and develop what others may see as challenging behaviors, unhelpful coping strategies, and distorted ways of viewing themselves, others and the world. This two hour course will explore the role of attachment, trauma and adverse childhood experiences on children’s behaviors, relationships and social emotional development, especially as relevant to how children present in the school environment. Participants will learn about the key principles of brain development, explore how traumatic experiences alter brain functioning, and will be encouraged to reflect on signs of trauma, secondary trauma and resilience and how past experiences shape everyday interactions.

    Presenter:

    Meagan Rohde, MSW, LCSW 

    Bilingual Child and Family Therapist  | Pronouns: she/her/hers

    Denver Children’s Advocacy Center

    July 28, 2020      1:00pm – 2:30pm MST

    Creating Safe Digital Learning Environments          

    How do you continue to create a safe and positive school climate in a virtual environment? Amid the stress and uncertainty surrounding COVID-19, it’s never been more critical to stay connected while supporting the social and emotional needs of students and educators. In this interactive virtual session, participants will explore ideas for establishing a safe, welcoming virtual classroom and discuss how to promote social connection with physical distance. The workshop will delve into considerations for safeguarding students, online safety, and positive online interaction. Recognizing and reporting if a student seems to be in distress or struggling while being particularly observant of vulnerable populations will also be discussed. Tools and resources for maintaining communication and connection will be provided.

    Presenters:

    Dr. Jan Urbanski, Director of Safe and Humane Schools, Institute on Family & Neighborhood Life, Clemson University

    June Jenkins, Training-Consultation Coordinator, Safe and Humane Schools, Institute on Family & Neighborhood Life, Clemson University

    July 29, 2020    8:00am – 9:30am MST

    Tips for Facilitating Effective Virtual Class Meetings          

    Many educators today are incorporating class meetings into their classroom routines.  Class meetings are a time when students and their teacher come together to collaborate, exchange ideas, deepen connections and jointly solve problems. They provide an arena for students to be seen, heard and understood along with opportunities to contribute, listen and empathize – skills that fall into the realm of “social and emotional learning” (SEL) which we know, today, to be equally as important as academic learning. Current circumstances have shifted interactions into virtual settings and the class meeting, which was a time of connection, is now more challenging.  Yet, having that connection is still crucial for learning, a sense of belonging and mental wellness. This workshop will explore best practices for developing virtual class meetings that strengthen bonds with students – and theirs with one another - while building social and emotional competence and helping participants take steps toward healing their school communities.

    Presenters:

    Teresa LaSala, Positive Discipline Author and Lead Trainer, School Culture and Climate Specialist

    Kathleen McClay, Positive Discipline Trainer and School Culture and Climate Specialist

    July 29th             10am to 12:30pm MST

    Supporting Traumatized Children in the Classroom

    Offered as a follow up to Trauma: The Impact on the Development of Mind and Brain, however, you do not have to participate in Trauma: The Impact on the Development of Mind and Brain in order to register for this section.  This two hour course will build on the understanding of the impact of trauma to address the challenges teachers and service providers confront in the classroom when working with traumatized children. Participants will learn about and explore positive discipline, trauma-informed skills, and specific strategies to effectively support traumatized children in learning, self-regulating, cooperating and building healthy relationships in the school environment. Case examples and problem-solving ideas will be shared and time will be dedicated to considering how the cycle of trauma reactions may be interrupted to promote learning and resilience for both students and teachers. Participants will also be encouraged to connect their understanding of trauma to their personal challenges when working with children in order to integrate their learning and identify next steps.

    Presenter:

    Meagan Rohde, MSW, LCSW 

    Bilingual Child and Family Therapist  | Pronouns: she/her/hers

    Denver Children’s Advocacy Center

    July 29, 2020      1:00pm – 2:30pm MST

    Strategies to Increase Student Engagement and Sense of Belonging        

    Russian teacher and psychologist, Lev Vygotsky, asserted that social interaction plays a fundamental role in the process of cognitive development and suggested that learning takes place through the interaction students have with their peers, teachers, and others. Research has also demonstrated that students learn better when they participate in the process of learning. Engaging students increases their attention and focus, motivates them to practice higher-level critical thinking skills, and promotes meaningful learning experiences. If learning is such a social process that requires a high degree of engagement, how do we best respond during this time of social isolation? Teachers can still create effective learning environments that maximize engagement and a sense of belonging, but it does require using new strategies and techniques.  This interactive workshop will offer ideas for virtual classrooms (live), virtual learning (asynchronous), and even ideas for those who are sending home learning packets.

    Presenters:

    Dr. Jan Urbanski, Director of Safe and Humane Schools, Institute on Family & Neighborhood Life, Clemson University

    Jane Riese, Associate Director of Safe and Humane Schools, Institute on Family & Neighborhood Life, Clemson University

    July 27th – July 30th

    (Self-Paced Work with two Virtual Check-ins on July 27th to July 30th 9am - 10am)

    Distance Learning Structures and Strategies for Secondary Math Teachers
    Designed for grade 6-12 special education math teachers and general education math teachers, this virtual workshop will cover synchronous and asynchronous structures and strategies that increase engagement in our virtual classrooms. We will discuss different distance learning classroom set ups, community building techniques, and tech resources that help engage your students in doing math online. Teachers will walk away from this workshop with lesson tips, activities, and tasks ready for immediate use in their distance learning classrooms. Time commitment: 1 hour synchronous initial zoom meeting, asynchronous guided work to complete throughout week, 1 hour synchronous reflection zoom meeting.
    Presenter:

    Juliana Tapper is an experienced high school math teacher, co-teacher, mentor, PLC facilitator, professional developer, and instructional coach. With urban classroom experience in multiple states, as well as district level leadership, she is dedicated to improving educational opportunities for all students and teachers. As an independent Math Intervention Specialist, Juliana provides effective professional development, instructional coaching, and math leadership coaching to schools and districts looking to transform their secondary math outcomes, experiences, and department cultures.

    July 27th – July 30th

    (Self-Paced Work with two Virtual Check-ins on July 27th to July 30th 11am - noon)

    Strategies to Increase Engagement in Secondary Mathematics: Brick and Mortar Classroom 
    This workshop will be delivered virtually, however will be full of tips for traditional, brick and mortar classrooms, not remote learning classrooms. Teachers will learn and experience structures that engage ALL students in secondary math content as they also encourage discourse, perseverance, and reasoning in ways that are appropriate for the secondary level. Attendees will walk away with ready to implement strategies for their secondary math classroom whether in a special education or general education setting. Time commitment: 1 hour synchronous initial zoom meeting, asynchronous guided work to complete throughout week, 1 hour synchronous reflection zoom meeting.

    Presenter:

     Juliana Tapper is an experienced high school math teacher, co-teacher, mentor, PLC facilitator, professional developer, and instructional coach. With urban classroom experience in multiple states, as well as district level leadership, she is dedicated to improving educational opportunities for all students and teachers. As an independent Math Intervention Specialist, Juliana provides effective professional development, instructional coaching, and math leadership coaching to schools and districts looking to transform their secondary math outcomes, experiences, and department cultures.

    July 27th – July 30th

    (Self-Paced through Schoolology: the course opens at 8am on July 27th and closes at midnight on July 30th)

    Cultural & Linguistically Responsive Teaching

    7.5 hours, interactive, all-online course

    You can battle the students to get them where you want them to be, or you can use CLRT strategies to ENGAGE, EMPOWER, and ENTICE them to meaningfully interact with the curriculum.   You determine whether the school year will be long and arduous or energetic and joyful. The power is yours. The choice to use Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Teaching (CLRT) strategies to strengthen your teaching and your rapport with students is in your hands.

    As a result of your work in this course, you will be able to:

    • Use research-based CLRT strategies to strengthen your rapport with students!
    • Engage, Empower, and Entice students to be active members of the learning process!
    • Create engaging lessons that build and validate students’ cultural identities!

    CDE ELL PD Focus Standard-

    5.12 Quality Standard I: Educators are knowledgeable about CLD populations 5.12(1) ELEMENT A: Educators are knowledgeable in, understand, and able to apply the major theories, concepts and research related to culture, diversity and equity in order to support academic access and opportunity for CLD student populations.

    Presenter:

    Tami Taylor earned her Doctorate of Education in Teacher Leadership in 2014.  Dr. Taylor has more than 20 years of teaching experience at the elementary, secondary, and adult levels.  In her career she has worked as a bilingual teacher, bilingual literacy specialist, and as an educational consultant.  She is currently the course and professional development designer for the Denver Public Schools English Language Acquisition program.

    Sarah Grimm is the Senior Program Manager of ELA Teacher Qualification for Denver Public Schools.  She has an extensive background in developing and implementing professional development for teachers of multilingual learners.  Sarah is also a graduate adjunct instructor for CU Denver, specializing in the linguistic analysis of English and its implications for teaching as well as assessment and advocacy for multilingual learners. 

    July 27th – July 30th

    (Self-Paced through Schoolology: the course opens at 8am on July 27th and closes at midnight on July 30th)

    Instructional Strategies for CLD Students

    7.5 hours, interactive, all-online course

    This course will share powerful sheltering and scaffolding instructional strategies that support students’ learning, and are critical to the academic success of English learners (ELs) in content lessons.  ICLD is rigorous and standards-based content instruction with intentional planning and supports for academic language development. ICLD benefits all students and is critical for English Learners as it facilitates the successful learning of academic content and skills. 

    CDE ELL PD Focus Standard-

    5.15 Quality Standard IV: Educators are knowledgeable in the teaching strategies, including methods, materials, and assessment for CLD students. 5.15(1) ELEMENT A: Educators are knowledgeable in, understand and able to use the major theories, concepts and research related to language acquisition and language development for CLD students.

    Presenter:

    Tami Taylor earned her Doctorate of Education in Teacher Leadership in 2014.  Dr. Taylor has more than 20 years of teaching experience at the elementary, secondary, and adult levels.  In her career she has worked as a bilingual teacher, bilingual literacy specialist, and as an educational consultant.  She is currently the course and professional development designer for the Denver Public Schools English Language Acquisition program.

    Sarah Grimm is the Senior Program Manager of ELA Teacher Qualification for Denver Public Schools.  She has an extensive background in developing and implementing professional development for teachers of multilingual learners.  Sarah is also a graduate adjunct instructor for CU Denver, specializing in the linguistic analysis of English and its implications for teaching as well as assessment and advocacy for multilingual learners. 

    August 3rd          1pm to 3:30pm MST   **This is a REPEAT course, please do not register if you have already registered for the 28th**

    The Impact of Trauma on the Development of the Mind and Brain

    The relationships children experience with their primary caregivers become the template from which they understand all other relationships and the lens through which they view interactions outside the family. When disruptions to those relationships occur, and particularly when they are ongoing, children tend to adapt and develop what others may see as challenging behaviors, unhelpful coping strategies, and distorted ways of viewing themselves, others and the world. This two hour course will explore the role of attachment, trauma and adverse childhood experiences on children’s behaviors, relationships and social emotional development, especially as relevant to how children present in the school environment. Participants will learn about the key principles of brain development, explore how traumatic experiences alter brain functioning, and will be encouraged to reflect on signs of trauma, secondary trauma and resilience and how past experiences shape everyday interactions.

    Presenter:

    Meagan Rohde, MSW, LCSW 

    Bilingual Child and Family Therapist  | Pronouns: she/her/hers

    Denver Children’s Advocacy Center

    August 4th             1pm to 3:30pm MST    **This is a REPEAT course,  please do not register if you have already registered for the 29th** 

    Supporting Traumatized Children in the Classroom

    Offered as a follow up to Trauma: The Impact on the Development of Mind and Brain, however, you do not have to participate in Trauma: The Impact on the Development of Mind and Brain in order to register for this section.  This two hour course will build on the understanding of the impact of trauma to address the challenges teachers and service providers confront in the classroom when working with traumatized children. Participants will learn about and explore positive discipline, trauma-informed skills, and specific strategies to effectively support traumatized children in learning, self-regulating, cooperating and building healthy relationships in the school environment. Case examples and problem-solving ideas will be shared and time will be dedicated to considering how the cycle of trauma reactions may be interrupted to promote learning and resilience for both students and teachers. Participants will also be encouraged to connect their understanding of trauma to their personal challenges when working with children in order to integrate their learning and identify next steps.

    Presenter:

    Meagan Rohde, MSW, LCSW 

    Bilingual Child and Family Therapist  | Pronouns: she/her/hers

    Denver Children’s Advocacy Center